WTI Schedule for the 2023 TRB Annual Meeting

Many of WTI’s employees will attend the 2023 Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting (January 8-12, Washington, D.C.) to participate in an international collaboration and ideas exchange. They will also share their own research and expertise in poster sessions, lectures, and council meetings.

“Expected to attract thousands of transportation professionals from around the world, the meeting program covers all transportation modes, with sessions and workshops addressing topics of interest to policy makers, administrators, practitioners, researchers, and representatives of government, industry, and academic institutions. Workshops take place on the first and last day of the meeting.” (TRB Annual Meeting Homepage)

If you are attending TRB, we’d love to see you! Join us at any of the events listed on the schedule below.

Sunday, January 8th

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Laura Fay, presiding Low-Volume Roads Sustainable Pavement Design and Rehabilitation Methods (AKD30, AKP30) Workshop 1019 Convention Center, 202A

Monday, January 9th

8:00 AM – 9:45 AM Sajid Raza Statewide GNSS-RTN Systems: Survey of Practice Poster Session 2040, Board Number A203, Presentation Number TRBAM-23-00227 Convention Center, Hall A
8:00 AM – 9:45 AM Laura Fay, presiding Low-Volume Roads Conference Planning Meeting (AKD30) Marriott Marquis, Cherry Blossom (Mezz)
1:30 PM – 3:15 PM Patrick McMahon Blazing Trails in the 21st Century: Using E-Bikes to Map Trail Conditions in National Parks and Beyond Poster Session 3094, Board Number B712, Presentation Number P23-20670 Convention Center, Hall A
1:30 PM – 3:15 PM Charles Gould Laboratories on the Lakes: National Parks in Michigan: Drive, Walk, Ride, and Sail into a Multimodal Future Poster Session 3094, Board Number B713, Presentation Number P23-20672 Convention Center, Hall A
3:45 PM – 5:30 PM Laura Fay

Karalyn Clouser

Brooms, Blades, and Ice Breakers: Alternative Mechanical Snow Removal Innovations Lectern Session 2188, Presentation Number P23-20151 Convention Center, 102B
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM Natalie Villwock-Witte

Karalyn Clouser

Laura Fay

Effectiveness of Highway Safety Public Education at Montana Motor Vehicle Division and Vehicle Registration Stations by Streaming a Variety of Safety Content Poster Session 2227, Board Number A110, Presentation Number TRBAM-23-01300 Convention Center, Hall A

Tuesday, January 10th

10:15 AM – 12:00 PM Jamie Sullivan, presiding Impact of Climate Change on Rural Areas Lectern Session 2057, Introduction & Concluding Remarks Convention Center, 115B
10:15 AM – 12:00 PM Patrick McMahon, presenting Towards a proactive climate adaptation model: Long-term access and resilience planning at North Cascades National Park Lectern Session 2057, Presentation #4 – 15 min Convention Center, 115B
10:15 AM – 12:00 PM Ahmed Al-Kaisy Identification of Potential Improvements to the Highway Capacity Manual Methodology for Rural Bicyclists and Bicyclist Classification Poster Session 3148, Board Number B626, Presentation Number TRBAM-23-02602 Convention Center, Hall A
1:30 PM – 3:15 PM Ahmed Al-Kaisy Capacity at All-Way Stop Control Intersections: A Case Study Poster Session 3147, Board Number B617, Presentation Number TRBAM-23-00822 Convention Center, Hall A
1:30 PM – 3:15 PM Sajid Raza

Ahmed Al-Kaisy

Influence Area at Signalized and Stop-Control Intersections: Operational Analysis Poster Session 3148, Board Number B627, Presentation Number TRBAM-23-01414 Convention Center, Hall A
1:30 PM – 5:30 PM Natalie Villwock-Witte, presiding Transportation Needs of National Parks and Public Lands Committee (AEP20) Marriott Marquis, Liberty Salon K (M4)
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM David Kack, presiding/moderating Performance Assessment of Rural On-Demand Transit Service Lectern Session 3209 Convention Center, 147A

Wednesday, January 11th

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM Laura Fay, presiding Low-Volume Roads Committee Meeting (AKD30) Marriott Marquis, Tulip (Mezz)
10:15 AM – 12:00 PM Jamie Sullivan, presiding Rural Issues Coordinating Council (A0040C) Marriott Marquis, Liberty Salon N (M4)

IN THE NEWS: WTI Road Ecology Program Manager: Montreal Presentation Featured in International News Service

WTI’s Road Ecology Program Manager, Rob Ament, participated in a half-day event, held on the side of the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Global Biodiversity Framework meetings in Montreal, Canada on December 15, 2022. Hosted by the Infrastructure and Nature Coalition at the Nature Positive Pavilion, Rob led off the session devoted to “Nature Positive Infrastructure: Mainstreaming Biodiversity to Safeguard People and the Planet.”

He focused on Asia’s Linear Infrastructure safeGuarding Nature (ALIGN) Project, funded by USAID and implemented by the World Wildlife Fund and the Center for Large Landscape Conservation (CLLC). Rob serves as a Senior Conservationist for CLLC and has been instrumental in bringing more international attention to the issue of safeguarding nature during the development of infrastructure, such as roads and railways.

Highlights from Ament’s talk at the event were featured in an article by Sahana Ghosh, “Helping wildlife navigate road and railway infrastructure,” published online by Mongabay, an international news service.

WTI Researchers to Teach MSU Course on the Intersection of Transportation & Health

Transportation systems that prioritize motor vehicles have been linked to poor air quality and negative health outcomes such as asthma, may endanger walkers and cyclists, and disproportionately shift the negative effects onto minority and low-income communities. As a new generation of transportation engineers, planners, and policymakers join the workforce, it is important that they understand and have the skills to address the relationship between transportation and public health.

WTI researchers Rebecca Gleason and Matthew Madsen have partnered with the MSU College of Engineering to teach ECIV 491: Sustainable Transportation and Community Health. The 3-credit spring semester course is for students with Junior standing or above who are studying engineering, community health, planning, or a policy discipline. “Cities and towns are not built within silos by only engineers,” said Madsen. “For them to be sustainable and healthy, they need to be planned and developed by many different professionals. This class will give engineers and students in other disciplines the chance to learn from each other.”

Sustainable Transportation and Community Health is designed to provide students with a broad perspective on transportation design by exploring the evolution of both the U.S. and Dutch transportation systems, their divergence, and the design standards that support active infrastructure. “The Netherlands used to be much more car-dependent,” Gleason noted, “but due to a concerted effort starting in the 1970s they have become a model for a more people-focused transportation network. However, the U.S. fully embraced the private automobile, especially after World War II, and while there are some places around the country that are more bicycle, pedestrian, and transit-friendly, they are now the exception.”

The course will also introduce students to the policies and tools used to incorporate health into transportation planning, as well as provide hands-on experience to plan, implement, and evaluate a quick-build traffic-calming project. “The course goal,” remarked Madsen, “is to demonstrate the need for a balanced transportation system that incorporates health and focuses on equity in relation to all users, especially the more vulnerable ones.”

Registration for ECIV 491: Sustainable Transportation and Community Health is now open for spring 2023. The class will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:2am5 to10:40am. For more course information please contact Rebecca Gleason or Matthew Madsen.

 

National Center for Rural Road Safety announces Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems Toolkit

 Screen shot form the National Center for Rural Road Safety Website. Shows some of the categories in the Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems Toolkit.
Is your agency looking for innovative solutions to your most common transportation safety challenges? Are you interested in using technology, but not sure which one best fits the needs of your rural area? Or maybe you’ve considered Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) before, but are afraid they are too expensive or only applicable in an urban setting?
The National Center for Rural Road Safety’s (Safety Center) newly released Rural Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Toolkit can answer these questions and more! Updated and expanded from its 1997 version, the new toolkit contains 42 fact sheets focused on the most common critical needs in rural areas today including: Crash Countermeasures; Traffic Management; Operations & Maintenance; Emergency Services; Surface Transportation & Weather; Rural Transit & Mobility; and Tourism & Travel Information.
Each fact sheet provides detailed information including:
  • A description of the solution,
  • It’s applicability in a rural area,
  • Key components of the system,
  • Useful tips,
  • Examples of implementation,
  • Considerations before implementing,
  • Cost information, and
  • Additional resources.
Explore the new Rural Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Toolkit on the Safety Center’s website.

MDT Research Newsletter Profiles Three WTI Projects

WTI research is prominently featured in the new issue of Solutions, the research newsletter of the Montana Department of Transportation.  Three recently completed projects are profiled in feature articles:

  • “Prefabricated Steel Truss/Bridge Deck Systems.” This study was a WTI and MSU Civil Engineering project led by Damon Fick, Tyler Kuehl, Michael Berry, and Jerry Stephens. It evaluated a prototype of a welded steel truss constructed with an integral concrete deck, which has been proposed as a potential alternative for accelerated bridge construction (ABC) projects in Montana. Steel truss bridges are relatively light weight compared with plate girder systems, which makes them a desirable alternative for both material savings and constructability. See the WTI website for more information.
  • “Evaluation of Effectiveness and Cost-Benefits of Woolen Roadside Reclamation Products.” This research project developed three types of products for study: woolen erosion control blankets (ECBs), wool incorporated into wood fiber compost, and wool incorporated into silt fence. The project, supported by Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and the Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates, compared the wool products’ performance to roadside reclamation products commonly used for revegetating cut slopes. Rob Ament (P.I.) and Eli Cuelho served on the research team. Additional information is available on the WTI website.
  • “Feasibility of Non-Proprietary Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) for Use in Highway Bridges in Montana.” Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) has mechanical and durability properties that far exceed those of conventional concrete. However, using UHPC in conventional concrete applications has been cost prohibitive, costing 20 times that of conventional concrete. The overall objective of the Phase I research was to develop and characterize economical non-proprietary UHPC mixes made with materials readily available in Montana. The research was led by Michael Berry. Additional project information is available on the WTI website.

The MDT Solutions newsletter is available on the MDT website.

Lessons from Highway Wildlife Crossings in a North American Protected Area

Banff National Park and its environs in Alberta, Canada represents one of the best testing sites of innovative wildlife – roadway mitigation passages in the world. Although the major commercial Trans-Canada Highway (TCH) bisects the Park, a diverse range of engineered mitigation measures, including the incorporation of a variety of wildlife underpasses and overpasses have helped maintain large mammal populations and gather 25 years of important data.

View the full article as a pdf.

Newsletter Article April06FinalwPhotos