Rural Planning Webinar This Week!

Logo for National Center for Rural Road SafetyThe National Center for Rural Road Safety will host a free webinar on “Rural Multimodal Planning” on Thursday June 20 at 11 a.m. (Mountain Time).

This webinar will explore why and how rural communities and small towns should apply more multimodal planning. It will describe current demographic and economic trends that are increasing demands for walking, bicycling and public transit in rural communities; then it will present specific policies and programs that can help create more diverse and efficient transport systems. This presentation is based on research described in the report, “Rural Multimodal Planning” (www.vtpi.org/rmp), and related documents. To learn more and to register, check out the webinar announcement.

Bozeman Commuter Challenge off to great start with Bike Week!

Twelve WTI and MDT staff members pose with bicycles in front of MSU transportation building.The Bozeman Commuter Challenge kicked off on June 1 with Bike Week.  Staff from WTI and the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Design Team enthusiastically joined in by leaving their cars at home and cycling to work!

The Challenge runs through June 30, so it’s not too late to join.  Log your bike, walk, bus, or carpool trips all month long! Are you signed up at bozemancommute.org? Head there to register, and check out how it works by reading the Challenge FAQs.

Webinar will Showcase Research on Law Enforcement Agency Culture

The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) will host a webinar featuring research by a team from the Center for Health and Safety Culture.  MDT recently released the final report for “Understanding Law Enforcement Attitudes and Beliefs about Traffic Safety,” which aimed to understand how the culture within law enforcement agencies impacts engagement in traffic safety enforcement.  CHSC researchers, including Jay Otto, Kari Finley, Kelly Green, and Nic Ward, led the research on behalf of the Traffic Safety Culture Pooled Fund program. The team conducted surveys and interviews with 19 law enforcement agencies in four states to collect data for the assessment.

The webinar, which will provide an overview of the research results, will be held on Monday, July 8.  Learn more and sign-up at the registration website. The final research report and a project summary report are available on the MDT project webpage.

Bozeman Commuter Challenge has begun!

Graphic for Bozeman Commuter Challenge shows pedestrian, bus, bicycle, and carpool.It’s on folks! The Bozeman Commuter Challenge kicked off on June 1 and runs through June 30. Log your bike, walk, bus, or carpool trips all month long! Are you signed up at bozemancommute.org? Head there to register, and check out how it works by reading the Commuter Challenge fact sheet.

For the first week, check out the daily activities for Bike Week.  Lots of local businesses will be offering free coffee, snacks or other surprises during morning or evening commute hours.

WTI is a partner with the Bozeman Commuter Project for this event, so let’s do our part!

 

CHSC Releases Training Videos for Health and Safety Professionals

The Center for Health and Safety Culture (CHSC) has released online resources called “Brief Spotlight Videos,” which address key topics on a variety of critical public health and safety issues. The videos provide practical tips and ideas for practitioners who address these issues on a daily basis.

 

 

The Spotlights include:

  • Applying Motivational Interviewing to Advocate for the Positive
  • Meetings 101
  • Medication Assisted Treatment
  • Networks and Buy-Ins
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences
  • Stigma Training Series (six videos)

The Spotlights can be viewed at https://chsculture.org/trainings/brief-spotlight-videos/.

MSU News Highlights New Book on Traffic Safety Culture

Thank you, Montana State University News, for your feature article on the new Traffic Safety Culture book. MSU News interviewed CHSC Director Nic Ward for “MSU Researcher Co-authors Book on New Approach to Traffic Safety,” which was featured on the MSU News website. “It’s a new way of looking at an old problem,” said Ward; “Traffic safety has traditionally looked at engineering, enforcement and education as a way to make drivers behave safely. Because most crashes are the result of driver behavior, it is imperative to understand how culture influences driver behavior.”

Traffic Safety Culture: Definition, Foundation, and Application includes major contributions by the staff of the Center for Health and Safety Culture.  CHSC Director Nic Ward was one of the three book editors and co-authored several chapters. Center staff and affiliated Montana State University faculty who also co-authored book chapters include Jay Otto, Kari Finley, Kelly Green, Eric Austin, and William Schell.  (Legal disclaimer: Editors receive a royalty payment from the publisher.)