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An Assessment of Traffic Safety Culture Related to Driving After Cannabis Use

Started: June, 2015 Ended: November, 2016 Project ID #4W5483 Status: Completed

Results & Findings

The final report describes the results from the research survey, which measured DUIC behavior, intention, willingness, attitudes, behavioral beliefs, perceived norms, and perceived control. About half of the individuals who had used cannabis in the past 12 months reported driving within four hours of use. Partial correlation coefficients showed that many components of the model correlated with willingness to DUIC. Significant differences in attitudes and beliefs were found between non-users of cannabis, users of cannabis, and those who DUIC. No differences in beliefs or attitudes were found between states with and without legalized recreational use laws nor between states with legalized medical use laws. The final report also includes recommendations for strategies to reduce DUIC.

Objective

The objective of this project is to explore specific aspects of traffic safety culture that relate to the decision to drive after consuming cannabis.

Abstract

An important risk factor in traffic safety is use of drugs that impair driver perception, decision-making and skill. Cannabis has been shown to impair driver ability, and its use is on the increase. Several states have legalized recreational cannabis use, and more are considering legalization. Increased use of cannabis among drivers may pose a barrier to achieving a zero deaths strategy. Therefore, understanding the cultural factors that influence driving under the influence of cannabis is critical to address this problem. This research focuses on specific aspects of traffic safety culture that relate to the decision to drive after consuming cannabis. The project will seek to answer three critical questions: 1) How does culture compare between users and non-users of cannabis? 2) How does culture affect the decision to drive under the influence of cannabis? and 3) How does culture compare between states with and without legalized recreational use laws? By understanding the cultural factors that predict driving under the influence of cannabis (including the impact of legalization), transportation and public health agencies will be better able to bolster existing protective factors and develop interventions to address risk factors.  

Contacts

  • Nic Ward - PI

  • Susan Sillick - Main External Contact

Files & Documents

Sponsors & Partners

  • Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Sponsor

Related Information

Part of: Safety and Operations, Safety Culture

Project Tagged In: traffic safety culture, impaired driving, cannabis

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