Road Ecologists Author Book Chapter on Wildlife Crossings

WTI Road Ecology Program Manager Rob Ament and colleagues Renee Callahan and Hannah Jaicks (both of the Center for Large Landscape Conservation) authored a chapter in the recently published book Biological Conservation in the 21st Century: A Conservation Biology of Large Wildlife.  Their chapter is entitled ”Crossroads Conservation: Identifying Solutions to the Cultural Barriers of Transportation Agencies so Internal Champions of Wildlife Crossings Can Thrive,” and summarizes similarities and differences among states regarding their approach to wildlife crossings.  It includes results of Hannah Jaicks post-doc work interviewing department of transportation personnel in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming on barriers to building wildlife crossings.  This research was sponsored through a partnership with the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative.

Citation: Jaicks, H., Ament, R. and Callahan, R. (2017). Crossroads Conservation: Identifying Solutions to the Cultural Barriers of Transportation Agencies so Internal Champions of Wildlife Crossings Can Thrive in Campbell, Michael O’Neal (editor), Biological Conservation in the 21st Century: A Conservation Biology of Large Wildlife (pp 91 -120). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies.

Researchers from WTI’s Winter Maintenance program have published “Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies.” This case study investigated the corrosive effects of chemicals used for snow and ice control operations, to better understand the potential impact on transportation infrastructure and motor vehicles.

Citation: Shi, X., Zhou, G., and Muthumani, A. (2017).  Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies. Case Studies in Construction Materials, vol 7: pp 1-14.

Native plants for roadside revegetation in Idaho

Road Ecology Program Manager Rob Ament and colleagues in the MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences will have an article published in the Spring 2017 edition of Native Plants Journal. “Native plants for roadside revegetation in Idaho” documents their field study to evaluate the success of sustainable roadside revegetation strategies on 16 sites in Idaho.

Citation: Ament, R., Pokorny, M., Mangold, J., and Orloff, N. (2017). Native plants for roadside revegetation in Idaho. Native Plants Journal, vol 8 (1): pp 4-19.

Wool Blankets for Erosion Control: Research Highlighted in International Publication

Environmental Connection, the magazine of the International Erosion Control Association, published a feature article about Rob Ament’s wool research in its July 2017 issue.  “Bullish for Wool: Using Wool in Erosion Control Blankets Shows Promising Results in Montana Study” summarizes the results of a project funded by the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and the Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates (CESTTiCC). The goal of the field study was to conduct a side-by-side comparison of the performance of wool products with the performance of more commonly used roadside reclamation products (straw/coir ECBs and wood fiber compost). The woolen reclamation products developed for this project demonstrated notable results: all six types of wool erosion control blankets outperformed the control products. Since the project targeted the use of waste wool or other harvested fiber that is substandard or currently unmarketable, the use of this wool for erosion control offers both environmental and economic benefits.

Overview of Test Plots

Experimental plots  along U.S. Highway 287 near Three Forks, Montana

 

New Publication: “Effectiveness of Liquid Agricultural By-products and Solid Complex Chlorides for Snow and Ice Control,”

The Journal of Cold Regions Engineering has published “Effectiveness of Liquid Agricultural By-products and Solid Complex Chlorides for Snow and Ice Control,” authored by Anbu Muthumani and Xianming Shi. The article summarizes their work to conduct a laboratory investigation of the thermal properties, ice melting behavior, and corrosivity of agro-based deicers, in order to compare their effectiveness to traditional deicers.
Muthumani, Anburaj and Shi, Xianming (2017). Effectiveness of Liquid Agricultural By-products and Solid Complex Chlorides for Snow and Ice Control. Journal of Cold Regions Engineering, Vol 31, Issue 1 (March 2017). http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29CR.1943-5495.0000112

Center for Health and Safety Culture releases report for “An Assessment of Traffic Safety Culture Related to Engagement in Efforts to Improve Traffic Safety.”

Report Cover-CHSC-An Assessment of Traffic Safety Culture Related to Engagement in Efforts to Improve Traffic Safety. Includes MDT Logo + Multiracial hands all reaching and connecting in the center of a group.Are you a good (traffic safety) citizen? The Center for Health and Safety Culture (CHSC) has released the final report for “An Assessment of Traffic Safety Culture Related to Engagement in Efforts to Improve Traffic Safety.” Conducted in partnership with the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture, this research explored the specific aspects of traffic safety culture that predict engagement in traffic safety citizenship behaviors. Examples of “safety citizenship” behaviors include asking someone to put on a seat belt or to refrain from using a cell phone while driving. Instead of trying to reduce risky behaviors among a small group of individuals, the goal is to instill a sense of responsibility in everyone for the safety of others. The results of this project as well as information about methodology and analysis can be found in the final report.
Download Report DirectlySAFETY_CITIZENSHIP_FINAL_REPORT
Download SummarySAFETY_CITIZENSHIP_PSR

New Publication: A Comparison of the Effects of Continuous versus Discontinuous Movement Patterns on Parkinsonian Rigidity and Reflex Responses to Passive Stretch and Shortening

Anbu Muthumani co-authored an article for the Journal of Nature and Science with colleagues in the MSU Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department. “A Comparison of the Effects of Continuous versus Discontinuous Movement Patterns on Parkinsonian Rigidity and Reflex Responses to Passive Stretch and Shortening” summarizes a project to study the effects of stretching on the movement of patients with Parkinson’s Disease.
Citation: Powell D, Muthumani A, Xia R. A Comparison of the Effects of Continuous versus Discontinuous Movement Patterns on Parkinsonian Rigidity and Reflex Responses to Passive Stretch and Shortening. Journal of Nature and Science (JNSCI), 2(8):e201, 2016.

Researchers from WTI’s Winter Maintenance program collaborated on “Accelerated Laboratory Test Suggests the Importance of Film Integrity of Sealers on the Protection of Concrete from Deicer Scaling” for the Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering. The project compared the performance of five different sealers that protect concrete.
Citation: Dang, Y., Shi, X., Xie, N., McVey, E., and Kessel, A. (2016). “Accelerated Laboratory Test Suggests the Importance of Film Integrity of Sealers on the Protection of Concrete from Deicer Scaling.” J. Mater. Civ. Eng., 10.1061/(ASCE)MT.1943-5533.0001579, 04016065.

New Publication: Traffic Safety along Tourist Routes in Rural Areas.

The Transportation Research Record has published “Traffic Safety along Tourist Routes in Rural Areas,” authored by Yiyi Wang, David Veneziano, Sam Russell and Ahmed Al-Kaisy. The article is based on research that investigated the contributing factors for crash severity and crash likelihood of visiting drivers in or near three national parks in rural areas, and whether there were diffences in crash risk for local and tourist drivers.  The abstract is available on the MSU Publications website, and the full article is available through TRB.

Citation:
Wang, Y., Veneziano, D., Russel, S. and Al-Kaisy, A. Traffic Saftey Along Tourist Routes in Rural Areas.Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board,

No. 2568, Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C., 2016, pp. 55–63.

DOI: 10.3141/2568-09

New Publication: Understanding the Cultural Influences related to Driving After Cannabis

Report cover for Montana Department of Transportation. Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis. Center for Health and Safety CultureUnderstanding the Cultural Influences related to Driving After Cannabis: The Center for Health and Safety Culture completed a research project with the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture. The purpose of this research project was to understand which specific aspects of traffic safety culture predict the decision to drive under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). As more states decriminalize and legalize medical and recreational use of cannabis (marijuana), traffic safety leaders and public health advocates have growing concerns about DUIC. The results of this project help distinguish differences in culture between users and non-users of cannabis regarding traffic safety as well as provide recommendations for next steps. To review the final report, please visithttp://www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/cannabis-use.shtml.  To watch a recording of a webinar on this subject, please visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBhCM7MVq3o.